Posts Tagged ‘Keezer’

The brew: American Wheat part II. The last wheat I brewed was about 2 months ago, and the last beer I brewed was almost 1 1/2 months ago. Work and life have been so busy – I ended up having to squeeze in a brew day last minute.

 

Photo courtesy: Bellsbeer.com

 

The absence of Bells Oberon in California has me craving a crisp and clean wheat that I can have a few pints of in this triple digit heat, no water having, California summer. The last wheat brewed unfortunately fell to my friend, Acetaldehyde. It might’ve been high fermentation temperatures, bacterial infection, an underpitched amount of yeast, or any combination of a few other post boil factors. I’m sure there were at least a few other things going on in that batch, but the green apple and fruity esters overpowered just about everything else. So I decided to keep going with the same recipe.

 

 

Here’s what was supposed to happen:

 

 

American Wheat Recipe (Based on Jamil Z. Recipe)

 

  • 5 lbs. 8 oz. US 2 Row (50%)
  • 5 lbs. 8 oz. White Wheat (50%)
  • 1 oz. Williamette at 60 mins
  • .3 oz. Williamette at 0 mins
  • .3 oz. Centennial at 0 mins
  • American Hefe Strain (WLP 320 or Wyeast 1010)
  • Single Infusion Mash at 152 F for 60 mins

 

 

According to BeerSmith (for my equipment profile):

 

  • OG: 1.054
  • FG: 1.014
  • ABV: 5.3%
  • 19.3 IBUs

 

Here’s what really happened: 

The brew day setup.

The brew day setup.

 

Everything went according to plan. I entered it into a few competitions, and it took gold in each one… Okay, not really. I actually haven’t even tasted it yet. I will be transferring from primary to keg tomorrow, so it should be ready in about a week.

 

But the brew day really did go as well as I hoped. I used a nylon mesh BIAB bag as my false bottom, which was used in combination with the bazooka screen. The 11 lbs. grain bill with 50% wheat in my 5 gal. mash tun worked out just fine – No stuck sparge  like last American Wheat brew day!

 

I did mash a little higher than I expected – 155 F. I was trying to make up previous experience with my mash tun losing several degrees over the duration of the saccharification rest. Fortunately or unfortunately, the 155 F was consistent throughout the entire mash. For my purposes (drinking at home), the 3 degree difference will not be a major issue. I did pitch warmer than I wanted. I was aiming for around 70 F, but pitched around 80 F due to time constraints on the brew day.

 

Other than that, the day was fairly uneventful. I put the glass carboy in the fermentation chamber set for about 65F (the temp controller probe was taped to the carboy surrounded by some cloth to try to get a closer read). Here’s to a successful batch of American Wheat!

This post roughly marks this blog’s 1 year anniversary! Thanks for reading! Don’t forget to also find me at Sommbeer.com!
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Yes, it IS April already… but we still have 8 months left of this year! Why do I bring this up? As I’ve mentioned in a previous post, I have been traveling for work since December. I am definitely ready to get back home and start on the year’s first batches.

So far, I have about 10 batches planned for this year, but only about 5 different recipes – I am hoping to alter them and make the batches as consistent as possible. The base recipes are from the book Brewing Classic Styles, but as I progress I will be swapping various hops and yeasts to tailor to my own tastes. The recipes will be posted on my recipe page here. Here’s the plan for 2015 (all 5.5 gallon batches or less):

May – American Wheat Batch 1, American IPA Batch 1
June – American Wheat Batch 2
July – American IPA Batch 2
August – Belgian Tripel Batch 1, American Brown Batch 1
September – American IPA Batch 3
October – American Brown Batch 2
November – American Stout (Style TBD) Batch 1
December – American IPA Batch 4

Totals:
Wheat – 2
IPA – 4
Brown – 2
Tripel – 1
Stout – 1

In other good beer news, I finally convinced the Mrs. to allow me to move forward with transitioning from bottling to kegging. The plan is to convert a chest freezer into a 4-tap keezer. I will definitely keep this blog updated with photos and my process once I get home. In the meantime, if you are looking for some info on converting your own, Northern Brewer created a great video on YouTube here. Here’s to a great 2015! Cheers!